Pages Navigation Menu

Take Us to Montevideo

“Take Us To… ” is an ongoing  travel series around the world which features several photographers in a given location.  The goal is to give you an inside look as to what the city is like day by day.

Last month we flew you to Chicago, and today, Flight #2 takes you to Montevideo – the capital city of Uruguay.

On this trip photographers, Ana, Denny, Federico R., Federico S., and Fernanda show us their favorite areas of Montevideo.  After viewing the video, please take a moment to read more about each photographer and see what they love most about their city.

Sit back, relax and enjoy the ride…

MEET THE PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ana Paula Rondán

Bio:  My name is Ana Paula Rondán, I am 24 years old. I work as a model for many years and currently am a fashion producer as well.  I was born in a small village, of 900 habitants in the center of the Oriental Republic in Uruguay.  I had a beautiful childhood surrounded by nature and pure air.

About the photo set: 

Photo1: Feria de Villa Biarritz/Villa Biarritz market.  In this type of business we can buy cheeses, grains, olive oil of artisanal and organic origin.

Photo2: Feria de Parque Rodo/Parque Rodo market.  Typical business of cold meat and cheeses.  They use little packaging and many others are recyclable.  For example: the eggs are wrapped in everyday paper.  You can also bring your own jars and they will fill with cream cheese, sweets, etc.  It is normal one asks to have a taste before buying.

Photo3: Feria vecinal/Neighborhood market.  The neighborhood markets are very popular in Uruguay.  It is an ecological way to consume.  Fortunately many Uruguayan families prefer the markets rather than the large supermarkets.

Photo4: Parada de ómnibus/Bus stop. I take this bus everyday and it stops at the door of my house.  It’s route.

Photo5: La señora/The woman.  Also went to the market.

Photo6: Typical street of my neighborhood in Parque Rodo.  In my neighborhood the houses aren’t high and old.  Have plenty of “platanus” and “Jacarandá”.

Photo7: Castillo del Parque Rodó – Library María Stagnero de Munar. Located in the center of the park 100meters from the beach.

Photo8: I really like boat trips.  This man works everyday in the park.

Photo9: Parque Rodo/Rodo Park. There are many businesses that make “churros” in my neighborhood but his one in particular stands out for serving “churros” with cheese.

Photo 10: Parque Rodo. My neighborhood also has games with views of the beach.  Every weekend people come from all parts of Montevideo to enjoy the park and the games.

Bio:  My name is Ana Paula Rondán, am 24 years old.  I work as a model for many years and am now a fashion producer as well.  I was born in a very small village, of 900 habitants in the center of the Oriental Republic of Uruguay.  I had a beautiful childhood surrounded by nature and pure air.

Contact: Twitter // Instagram // Facebook

1.  Are you originally from Montevideo? What is your line of profession?  And how does it influence your photography?

I was born in Cardona in the department of Soriano, Uruguay.

I work as a professional model for more than 10 years.  I also directed a fashion magazine for two years and nowadays work as a fashion producer, besides working as a model.  In taking part in all of these productions, along my career, I started to feel a certain attraction for photography and the truth is I began to experiment when Instagram entered my life last year.

2.  What do you feel makes Montevideo unique?

Montevideo is a very calm city, with a very big coastline which plays a significant part in the mood of the Uruguayans   In appearance, it is a city of the past. Its architecture is very old, and so are the automobiles.  Something that makes Uruguayans unique is that everyone drinks “mate” all the time and everywhere, this calls much attention to the people who visit from other countries.

Es una casa de herramientas en el bosque  de Lussich en Portezuelo,  Maldonado, Uruguay.

3.  What is your favorite typical dish?  Is there a local restaurant which you recommend that serves it just the way you like it?

My favorite food is the “chivito” of Bar Sporting.  It is a bar en Parque Rodo managed by its owners.

4.  Is there a place which you classify as a “hidden gem”?

Twice a week in every neighborhood of Montevideo we have large markets of fresh fruits and vegetables, cheap and many of them are organic.

5.  What tip would you give to someone traveling to Montevideo for the first time?

Personally I recommend not looking for big parties and bars.

6.  How would you describe the people of Montevideo?

The people of Uruguay are very kind, charming and very relaxed.  The big river greatly influences the Uruguayan’s personality.

Las Toscas.

Este balneario queda a 30 minutos de Montevideo, en el kilómetro 47.5.

Es una de mis playas favoritas.  Hay un ambiente muy familiar  y tranquilo.

7. Have you had any professional training in photography?

No, I am not a photographer.  I take pictures for pleasure.

8.  Are you involved with any collaborations or projects you’d like to share?  

No.

9.  If you’re not taking photographs, you are… 

These days I am making frames with flowers that I have collected, dehydrated and have kept throughout the summer.

——————–

Denny Brechner

About the photo set:  Day and night by the sea.

Bio:  Born in Montevideo in 1983, lived in Uruguay, Israel, London and Shanghai.   Studied Film in College where I directed the documentary, “The Big Trip”, about Israeli soldiers travelling after finishing the army.  After school I worked in several film projects. Now am established in Montevideo, working as a freelance photographer.

Contact: Instagram // Twitter

 

1.  Are you originally from Montevideo? What is your line of profession?  And how does it influence your photography?

I’m from Montevideo. I am working with a software company in the chinese market. My photography was influenced  by all the travels, making street photography one of my favorite areas.

2.  What do you feel makes Montevideo unique?

I feel Montevideo is unique for its rhythm, being very peaceful for a capital.

Untitled

3.  What is your favorite typical dish?  Is there a local restaurant which you recommend that serves it just the way you like it?

Chivito and Milanesa. La pasiva is a good place for local food

4.  Is there a place which you classify as a “hidden gem”?

Not really.

5.  What tip would you give to someone traveling to Montevideo for the first time?

Montevideo doesn’t have super famous spots, it is generally the vibe what makes it unique. You need a few days to see it.

6.  How would you describe the people of Montevideo?

Well educated, humble, peaceful.

Untitled

7.  Have you had any professional training in photography?

I started as a professional last year working with some magazines.

8.  Are you involved with any collaborations or projects you’d like to share?  

Not yet.

9.  If you’re not taking photographs, you are… 

Playing soccer, diving and cooking.

——————–

Federico Racchi 

About the photo set:  Montevideo is a small port city which lives and looks to the sea. As a lucky “montevideano”, I grew up living one block from the “Rambla” of “Punta Carretas”, then moved to “Buceo” and finally to “Pocitos”, living always only a couple of blocks from the sea. This place is like our backyard. We have experienced many things there, first football shoots, swimming, fishing, kissing, drinking “mates”, beer or having our first cigarette and more… A magical place from which to observe calm and feel relaxed.

Bio:  I work and live in Montevideo as a graphic designer and freelance photographer. I have lived a few years away from my hometown, first in Dominican Republic and then in New York. In 2009 I came into photography and started going out to the streets looking for emotions, lifestyle and anthropological shapes of the city and citizens.

Contact: Instagram // Twitter // Flickr // Website

1.  Are you originally from Montevideo? What is your line of profession?  And how does it influence your photography?

I live and work in Montevideo as a graphic designer. My career has taken me to the visual art field and experiment with all kind of cameras, film, lomo, dslr, mostly while on vacation or other travel experiences. Besides, I have lived a few years in Dominican Republic and New York.

2.  What do you feel makes Montevideo unique?

The city which looks at the sea, the mild climate and the people which I think have a taste, education and creativity in all art levels, like music and poetry for example making Montevideo, with its 1.5 million people, unique.

Untitled 

3.  What is your favorite typical dish?  Is there a local restaurant which you recommend that serves it just the way you like it?

The typical dish here is the ‘asado’ (meat ribs), you can have it at any ‘parrillada’, but for me the best in town is called ‘La Otra’ in Pocitos neighborhood. Also you can have the most tourist experience, going down town to ‘El Mercado del Puerto’.

Besides, you can find fresh fish everywhere :)

4.  Is there a place which you classify as a “hidden gem”?

There is a dock in the Buceo’s bay thats is a gem and another one in ‘Punta Brava’ .

5.  What tip would you give to someone traveling to Montevideo for the first time?

Well I think like in most other cities, it is in food workers where you will find the real answers about the city. However one tip I can give is to don’t miss the ‘Tambores’ experience (F. Sardi will tell you for sure). Because like my friend @pendehooo tattoo says “Music is the answer” and Films too!!!

Some Uruguayan films you must see are: “25watts”, “Whisky”, “El Baño del Papa”.

6.  How would you describe the people of Montevideo?

I think we are simple middle class people, with stronger values in social justice and compromise in politics. We are very extreme in our beliefs as well as very passionate for soccer….hehehe.

We are quite conservative in our way of dressing but very forward thinking in topics like equal same sex marriage and legal abortion rights. Besides our country has innovated education by the “one laptop per child” program, from which we feel really proud.

7.  Have you had any professional training in photography?

Not in depth, but during my graphic designer graduate degree we had a couple of courses to introduce us to the photography field, which we then experienced for most of our projects.

Untitled 

8.  Are you involved with any collaborations or projects you’d like to share?  

I took part in the 24 hour project in March. It was an amazing experience which you can check in the post by @Koci, which was published in here. Besides, I’m about to start the 100strangers on flickr group to improve the streets conversations. On the other hand, I also have a food project in progress, together with my chef and designer friends.

9.  If you’re not taking photographs, you are… 

While taking photos and or not I spend the time with my love @marusilva and my dog #edmalab. We enjoy walking by the beach everyday. And I have an obsession with auteur cinema, like watching 7 to 10 films a week.

——————–

Federico Sardi

About the photo set:  My passion with mobile photography began almost accidentally. As an orchestra musician I travel a lot to study and perform abroad. As I’m always carrying my instrument, accesories, music stand and lots of scores, the only camera I can carry with me is my iPhone. I started documenting all my travels with that little device and found that its camera could get in many places where a “real camera” could not. That’s where my passion for street photography started.
After coming back to Uruguay I started looking at it with “tourist eyes”.  I started discovering new details every day, just like if I was visiting a new country. From that moment on I’ve been photographing Montevideo daily, getting to know its architecture, its people, its little secrets from a completely different perspective. Through candids I’m capturing slices of life, I’m documenting life from an artistic point of view.

Thanks to my camera-phone, I discovered a new passion I couldn’t live without; photography.  I think these pictures are a good sample of what I want to portray; fractions of a second of the life of ordinary people, doing ordinary things, that turn into magic… into an honest (but nonetheless artistic) documentation of life, here and now, as seen through my eyes.

Bio:  Federico Sardi is a bassoonist of the Montevideo Philarmonic and OSSODRE orchestras, a passionate iPhoneographer and a MPA Honorable Mention (Performing Arts 2013)

EyeEm ambassador: @federicosardiInstagramers Uruguay‘s manager, Instagram Artistry moderator, Mobile Artistry contributor & AMPt member

Contact: Instagram: @federicosardi & @estopasaya // Backspaces: @federicosardi // Twitter: @SardiFederico // Blog: http://iPhoneografiaBN.tumblr.com

1.  Are you originally from Montevideo? What is your line of profession?  And how does it influence your photography?

I was born in Montevideo, in November 1990, and I’m a professional musician. I’m a bassoonist of the Montevideo Philharmonic and OSSODRE (National Symphony) orchestras.

Music is one way of expressing myself, photography is just another one. It is something that I need to do almost as much as make music. When my job gets too demanding and stressful or when I feel I’m not having enough “artistic freedom” (as an orchestra musician is more or less a soldier under the conductor’s command), I tend to shoot even more, as a way to find a balance over my “artistic needs”.

I’d rather learn from one bird how to sing than to teach ten thousand stars how not to dance – - E. E. Cummings 

2.  What do you feel makes Montevideo unique?

The beautiful “rambla” (promenade) by the Río de la Plata and the Ciudad Vieja (Old City) neighborhood are emblems of the city.

The Ciudad Vieja keeps all Montevideo’s oldest secrets in its ancient buildings, narrow streets and beautiful plazas. It has a huge concentration of offices and government buildings and its also always full of turists what makes that part of the city a gem for street photographers.

Tango (as many other “urban music styles”) was born in the outskirts of Ciudad Vieja, close to the docks where the poor people found a way to express their pain and nostalgia through dance and music. It still has some “dark” areas that I think contribute to its magic.

La Rambla which frames the southern part of our city is a beautiful place to take a walk or just enjoy the view of the Rio de la Plata and the beautiful summer sunsets over the water.

I’ve put up a Foursquare list with must-see places of Montevideo (historical, turistic, bars and restaurants) that won the Foursquare Cities contest.  If you use Foursquare and have the chance to visit our city you can even get the Mateína badge by checking on 5 of those places too!

3.  What is your favorite typical dish?  Is there a local restaurant which you recommend that serves it just the way you like it?

There are many typical dishes. I should say that “asado“ is the principal. My personal favourite is Chivito. If you want to know what a Chivito is, you’ll definetly have to see what Anthony Bourdain has to say about it.

If you want to eat asado you’ll definetly have to go to Mercado del Puerto on Ciudad Vieja (listed on the Foursquare list), that is a huge old food “market” that has many “parrilladas”, the places where asado is best made. About chivitos, I’d recommend you to try chivitos in every bar and restaurant until you find the one that you like the best. Every place has some disctintive way of preparing chivitos. My favourite chivito will most likely be the next to come!

4.  Is there a place which you classify as a “hidden gem”?

I think Montevideo is full of “hidden gems”, it’s just a matter of being adventurous and looking for those gems. If you saw the full Anthony Bourdain episode on Uruguay you’ll surelly know what I’m talking about.

If you come to visit Montevideo you’ll have to visit Palermo and Barrio Sur neighborhoods to hear some candombe (a beautiful rhythm  legacy of the slaves, that used to call eachother with the sound of the drums), and visit the Feria de Tristán Narvaja (Sunday mornings), a traditional flea market in which you can find anything from old wrecked cameras and used clothes, from fine antiques and first editions of old books that may worht thousands but be misslabeled at just a few dollars. Great place for street photography too!

5.  What tip would you give to someone traveling to Montevideo for the first time?

If you’re adventurous, go off the “prestablished tourist route”. Learn the codes of the city, dress like a local, go out and explore! Most distances in Montevideo are short so grab a map (traveler tip: take screenshots of the places you’re planning on visiting on the map application and use that. Don’t rely on wifi networks! You wont’ find many) and go explore!

There are a few more tourist tips on the interview I gave to the romanian site TukTuk.

6.  How would you describe the people of Montevideo?

I always describe and “judge” the people of a city when I’m there as a tourist. Can’t say the same about Montevideo, but I’d like to think that people is gentle and always willing to help a lost tourist!

I believe that the best way to get to know the people of Montevideo without actually visiting the city is through candid portraits. You can take a look at my feed on Instagram or EyeEm and Federico Racchi’s feed on Instagram to see candid portraits of our people from two different perspectives.

7.  Have you had any professional training in photography?

No, my passion for photography began with my iPhone. Since I discovered the world of mobile and iPhone photography (iPhoneography, coining Glyn Evans therminology) I’ve been self teaching myself by constantly shooting and reading all I can find, exploiting all the resources that internet provides.

I’m actively involved on the iPhoneography world, beta testing apps, taking pictures (literally) every day and diving in many many projects. I found a new passion and I’m serious about it. I’m putting as much effort on it as I do on music.

Going back to what was asked, I attended one of the excellent online Mobile Photo Workshops (the one on street photography) by Anton Kawasaki and Sion Fullana. I must say I absolutely loved it. It was also a great thing to be able to have them following closely your work, interacting with you and making full use of what technollogy has to offer. Most of the “action” regarding mobile and iPhone photography is happening in the US and on Europe in a smaller degree. It’s very hard to us, south americans, to be a part of it so I celebrate Anton and Sion’s decision to make the workshops online. They’re planning on bringing back the workshops soon, so stay tuned!

Pity the country that needs heroes – - Bertold Brecht 

8.  Are you involved with any collaborations or projects you’d like to share?  

I’m managing Instagramers Uruguay, the local igers network and that allows me to enlarge the mobile community by encouraging igers to use their mobile phones. That is a huge satisfaction, but it also takes a huge amount of work and effort. One of the main short term goals with@igersuruguay is to make a first mobile photography exhibition. On Instagram I’m also moderating the Instagram Artistry account (@ig_artistry) and contributing to Mobile Artistry (@mobileartistry).

I’m also an EyeEm ambassador but haven’t started anything in Uruguay yet, because I may be moving to Düsseldorf, Germany for a while, so that will be a great opportunity to start something there (although the language barrier would make things hard, I think it would be a great experience). I have to confess that I’d really love to work with the guys at EyeEm, the potential of the platform is amazing, and I found that there is a great team behind it. Can’t wait to meet them in person. I’m also on the process of becoming a Juxter (that’s supposed to be a secret…right?). I love what the community is doing and I’d love to collaborate with some bilingual content (spanish and english) to make everything mobile accesible to even more people around the globe. I also discovered recently that I really enjoy writing, so I’ll definetly be doing that more often!

9.  If you’re not taking photographs, you are… 

If I’m not taking photographs, I’m listening or making music (not only classical!) or I’m working endless hours on all my Apple devices (yes, I use a MacBook Pro, an iPad and two) iPhones  to manage, moderate and contribute to the different communities I’m into, besides processing and uploading my own images. I used to read a lot but now I barely have time to keep up with everything that’s going on on my life. On Sundays (every two weeks) I meet a group of crazy music lovers to play a music game that has a history of 60 plus years on Uruguay. In this meetings a host plays a carefully curated selection of classical pieces for the attendance to guess who composed them. Almost non of them are musicians, but their level of knowledge is absolutely unveliavable. Now I’m starting to think that interviewing and photographing them could actually be a great project to get involved into!

——————–

Fermontoro

About the photo set:  I lived abroad for many years, and each time I would come to visit my home city I was surprised to see its cars. Montevideo remains a treasure of the past and, within it, a treasure of cars ‘with character’. So I started to work on a series of photos taken with the iPhone, based on those cars and the portraits behind them. This is a selection of the ongoing series.

Bio:  Fernanda Montoro was born in Montevideo, Uruguay. During the process of making documentaries, Fernanda discovered her passion for photography. Today she lives and works as a photographer between London and Montevideo, using mainly vintage Polaroid cameras. Her limited edition prints and original polaroid work have been exhibited in galleries around the world and published in numerous magazines and books.

Contact: Website // Facebook // Twitter // Instagram

1.  Are you originally from Montevideo? What is your line of profession?  And how does it influence your photography?

I was born and raised in Montevideo but I lived most of my adult life abroad. I am a photographer and I work mainly with Polaroid and analogue cameras. Photography is an important part of my life.

2.  What do you feel makes Montevideo unique?

I think Montevideo combines the buzz of a capital city with the feel of a small town. Add to that mix long stretches of coastline, architectonic treasures and very laid back people.

Rosas Rojas

3.  What is your favorite typical dish?  Is there a local restaurant which you recommend that serves it just the way you like it?

I’m vegetarian and Uruguay is a famous meat- eating country. In the past there haven’t been many options for me to eat-out! But luckily things are rapidly changing now. No fave veggie place yet, but more options than before, especially in the old city.

4.  Is there a place which you classify as a “hidden gem”?

I often go to “El Faro” de Punta Carretas to watch the sunset. It’s a good vantage point, and usually there are only a few fishermen and lots of stray cats at that time of the day.

5.  What tip would you give to someone traveling to Montevideo for the first time?

Watch your bag, cameras and walk. It’s a beautiful city to discover by foot.

6.  How would you describe the people of Montevideo?

I think in general people are friendly and open to conversation. Not very used to foreigners though.

7.  Have you had any professional training in photography?

No, I’m a Self-Taught Photographer. I had professional training in film making.

Ana Paula 

8.  Are you involved with any collaborations or projects you’d like to share?

I am currently working with my partner Agustin Ferrando on a video series about Uruguay, which broadcasts on YouTube on Mondays: Tiranos Temblad.  It reflects Uruguay idiosyncrasy, so I would recommend it to people who want to know more about our culture. Photography-wise I am working on two new series of photographs and also on a book, a collaboration with my writer friend Fernanda Trias. It’s taking us long but we are enjoying the process.

9.  If you’re not taking photographs, you are…

I’m enjoying being back home, spending time with Agustin, making and watching videos with him, cooking, playing videogames or reading.

I’d like to thank the photographers for showing us their wonderful city and for being a part of this series. Hopefully one day I’ll get to visit :)Bridgette

12 Comments

  1. Thank you, Bridgette for creating this awesome series.
    It’s an honor to be part of it!

    Looking forward to see more of “Take us to…”

    And, hey! You should definetly come visit! Mobile Photography is just the perfect excuse to make friends all over the world.

    Greetings from Montevideo!

    • Really enjoyed this edition and thanks again for the music! You did great ;)

  2. So so lovely to meet you all from Montevideo!!! What a delightful little place!! Never heard of it before but am in love with the quaintness and authenticity of it all! Beautiful pics!!

  3. This was a great read and awesome photos.

    • Glad you like it, John! Bridgette is doing a great work on this series.

      I guess we’re all looking forward to more!

      Greetings from Montevideo!

  4. Fantastic reading about your life in Uruguay and beautiful images

    • Glad you enjoyed the ride!

      Greetings from Montevideo, Uruguay

  5. Awesome trip to Uruguay! It looks like a beautiful place.

    • Glad you like it Jennifer!

      Greetings from Montevideo, Uruguay

  6. I loved reading this..what beautiful images–full of life!

    • Glad you enjoyed it, Suzanne!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Take Us To Toronto | We Are JUXT - [...] month we traveled to Montevideo and today we fly non-stop to Toronto, the largest city in [...]